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Chimpanzees

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Let's celebrate! 80 years on a journey of hope

Roots & Shoots



Chimpanzees

 

Chimpanzees are intelligent, social beings. Before Dr. Goodall began her landmark study of chimpanzees in 1960 however, almost nothing was known of their ecology and behaviour in the wild. Through our studies of chimpanzees, we humans have learned that we are not the only animals who have close family bonds, make and use tools, or engage in warfare against one another. In this section, you too can learn about our closest relatives!

Chimpanzees are important ecologically, culturally, and even economically, by maintaining and contributing to biodiversity. They also give us a glimpse of our evolutionary past and give us better understanding of what it means to be human.

 

Learn more about chimpanzees:

 

About Chimpanzees

How closely are we actually related to chimpanzees? How do chimpanzees communicate, how many species are there, and what kind of tools do they make and use? Find the answers to your questions about chimpanzees here!

 

Chimps We Know

Learn how Jane Goodall started it all – how she set out to Gombe Stream Reserve in 1960 and the chimpanzees she met there. Also, meet the chimpanzees that we are supporting today at our sanctuaries in Africa.

 

Conservation & Threats

Chimpanzees are critically endangered and on the brink of extinction. Learn about the severe and significant threats to the survival of chimpanzees in the wild, and what you can do to help today.

 

Chimpanzee Links

Need more information? Check out these links to our partners and colleagues who are part of a vast network of organizations, all working towards primate and wildlife research, conservation and education.

 

Become a Chimpanzee Guardian

Chimpanzees in the wild are on the brink of extinction. At the turn of the last century, chimpanzees were living in 25 countries across West and Central Africa numbering around one million. Today their total number has dwindled to less than 200,000, with significant populations found in only four countries.

Give a chimp a chance.  Sponsor an orphan chimp in one of our African sanctuaries.

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