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the Jane Goodall Institute of Canada - FOR WILDLIFE RESEARCH, EDUCATION AND CONSERVATION

Chimpanzees

Conservation & Threats

Bushmeat Crisis

 

 

 

Traditionally, bushmeat has always been utilized by local villagers to feed their families. However, with our increasingly globalized world, the demand for bushmeat in urbanized populations of Africa and around the world has created an unprecedented crisis for many critically endangered species, including chimpanzees and other great apes.

The trade of bushmeat is largely illegal, but very profitable for local people who often lack other sources of income. A hunter can earn approximately $300-$1000 annually -- significantly more than the average household income in any region. The meat is sold in rural and urban markets and among logging company employees, who can easily export the bushmeat with other extracted forest products.

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Commercial bushmeat trade has become the most immediate threat to the future survival of wildlife in the Congo Basin. More than 5 million tons of bushmeat are taken from the Congo Basin forests each year. In 2003, approximately 295 chimpanzees were slaughtered for bushmeat in The Republic of Congo alone. The total value of the bushmeat trade around the world is estimated to be worth $1 billion annually.

 

Learn about JGI’s work in the Congo Basin.

 

Connections to the Bushmeat Trade

 

What can we do?

JGI and its partners work towards effective solutions to tackle the bushmeat crisis and increase awareness in both the public and private sectors. JGI addresses the bushmeat crisis at its source, working with communities that live near wild ape populations, to educate them about our closest animal relatives and to provide them with alternative methods of income generation, such as ecotourism and crafts.

Learn more about our programs.